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Yearbook 1991

Yearbook 1991

The Hockey News has been providing the most comprehensive coverage of the world of hockey since 1947. In each issue, you'll find news, features and opinions about the NHL and leagues across North America and the world.

IN THIS ISSUE

HOME OF THE CUP

It’s been three years since they last met in the playoffs for the Battle of Alberta, but that doesn’t mean the Edmonton Oilers and Calgary Flames have ceased hostilities. Just the opposite, in fact. In recent years, the pattern has been that no matter where the NHL season started, it would end in Alberta. Over the last eight seasons, either Calgary or Edmonton qualified for the Stanley Cup final. Edmonton made it six times and won five. Calgary made it twice and won once. The two organizations have been trying to one-up each other ever since 1980 and that highly-energized competition pushed both teams to impressive heights. In 1989, after the Oilers won their third crown, the Flames responded with a 117-point season and a Stanley Cup to call their own. In 1990, after the Flames…

IN THIS ISSUE

ON THE REBOUND

At the end of last season, the Detroit Red Wings sat in last place in the Norris Division. But that didn’t sit well with the front office, which has become accustomed to success. “One thing we’ve never done is sat on our a—,” says former general manager Jim Devellano. “We’ve acknowledged that we’ve had some weaknesses and we tried to fill them.” And how. Devellano elevated himself to the post of senior vice-president July 11 and within two days, the Wings had fired coach Jacques Demers and hired Bryan Murray to take on the dual task of GM-coach. Fired as coach of the Washington Capitals in midseason, Murray compiled a 343-246-83 record with the Caps but was never able to get them out of the Patrick Division playoffs. In his last two deals…

IN THIS ISSUE

HERE’S A SWITCH

Playing .500 hockey, a major accomplishment for the Toronto Maple Leafs last season, won’t be good enough this time around. This time last season. Leaf fans were bracing themselves for another year of disaster. This year, they’re expecting exactly the opposite. After seeing the Leafs’ 38-384 season, its first .500 year in 11 seasons, many will be expecting to see significant improvements. That won’t be easy. The Leafs play in the suddenly tough Norris Division, where the other teams are expected to be as good or better this season. As well, last spring’s humbling playoff loss to the St. Louis Blues unearthed many troubling questions about the level of desire in the Leaf camp. Much rests on the shoulders of defenseman Al lafrate, who is recovering nicely from a serious knee injury in…

IN THIS ISSUE

LOOKING FOR LEADERS

In every category, the Calgary Flames slipped back last year from the season before—in points, goals for, goals against, Stanley Cups won… Despite this measurable, statistical decline, the Flames still managed 99 points, second-best in the league; 348 goals, tops in the league; and, only 265 goals against, fourth in the league. The conclusion? Last season, the Flames were a good team that had a bad playoff, a disastrous first-round loss to the Los Angeles Kings that ultimately cost coach Terry Crisp his job. His replacement, Doug Risebrough, possesses the same single-minded will to win that Crisp did, so there were no guarantees this would be a kinder, gentler season for the players who rebelled against Crisp’s heavy-handed tactics. On the upside, the players may want to prove they were right. In the aftermath of…