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Collector's World 0204

Collector's World 0204

The Hockey News has been providing the most comprehensive coverage of the world of hockey since 1947. In each issue, you'll find news, features and opinions about the NHL and leagues across North America and the world.

IN THIS ISSUE

WORD TO COLLECTORS: GET WITH THE PROGRAM

Hockey programs differ from caret, coins, photos and other items that are produced as promotional items. Programs fall into the souvenir category of collectibles along with game-used sticks, jerseys and the puck you caught after it bounced off your girlfriend’s head at that Canucks’ game back in ’82. Most hockey fans probably have at least one or two of these they’ve kept as souvenirs. These are historical documents; part of the record of an actual event. They are meant to be read. Hockey program collectors tend to be students of the game. Randy Faist of Cambridge. Ont., has an extensive collection of programs dating back to the 1920s. His oldest NHL program is a Jan. 1. 1927 Montreal Canadiens vs. Ottawa Senators’ game for which he paid $16 though the Cartophillium monthly…

IN THIS ISSUE

PRO SET COMPLETES PARKHURST COMEBACK

For the first time since the 1963-64 season, hockey fans will be able to collect Parkhurst cards. Pro Set has signed an agreement with Dr. Brian Price of Toronto, the owner of the Parkhurst license, to produce two series of cards bearing the Parkhurst name before the end of this season. Price purchased the Parkhurst name in 1985 from the original owners of the company. He is partners with two Toronto-area card store owners. “We looked around to see who would fit best with the comeback of Parkhurst,” Price said. “I talked to some manufacturers and frankly they weren’t even interested and others didn’t want to meet our conditions. We have a good agreement with Pro Set that’s forever.” One of the conditions Price set out was a requirement that Pro Set publish its…

IN THIS ISSUE

GREAT SCOTT: BOWMAN COLLECTS CARDS, TOO

Scott Bowman was introduced to the business aspect of collecting by Nolan Ryan-the card, not the man. In 1989, the interim coach of the Pittsburgh Penguins was in a Mt. Vernon, Ill., card shop looking to buy Upper Deck’s debut baseball set when he was offered a Ryan rookie card for what seemed like an outrageous price for one piece of cardboard. “It was more than $100- and it seemed like a lot of money at the time,” Bowman says. “But I bought it and I would say I got lucky on that card.” The Ryan rookie card, worth more than $1,000 today, is part of the continually growing Bowman family card collection. He shares his hobby with son, Stanley, a Notre Dame freshman, and Bobby, who is still in high school. “I don’t…

IN THIS ISSUE

RANDOM THOUGHTS

If I had a nickle for everytime I was asked a question about sportscards, I might even be able to afford to buy a box of Topps Stadium Club hockey. Sometimes I even have the answers. But one question I can’t answer is one that is frequently asked-what’s going to happen to the hobby? Kevin Allen’s story on page 22 examines the question regarding a hobby experiencing growing pains. You would think something more than 100 years old wouldn’t have such problems but that is exactly what’s going on right now. Pro Set alone will make more than 1,500 cards this season and that doesn’t include their French versions. Score has a 660-card Canadian Series (in two languages), a 440-card American version and will soon announce it is entering the premium hockey card market…