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November 30, 2004

November 30, 2004

The Hockey News has been providing the most comprehensive coverage of the world of hockey since 1947. In each issue, you'll find news, features and opinions about the NHL and leagues across North America and the world.

IN THIS ISSUE

WONDER BOY

He is a lord, a Legend, a universally respected icon who knows no predators and whose word can move mountains. For more than two decades he skated among giants twice his size and came away towering above all, superhero genius unmatched and undisputed. So many times he saved the day or came to the rescue - in Edmonton, in L.A., briefly in St. Louis and New York, all the world over wearing a Canadian maple leaf on his chest. With the world he helped create on the verge of implosion, Wonder Boy now wields his influence from the executive suite in Phoenix. His geographical home makes little difference to the players who would be playing, or to the legions of scribblers who would be writing about it, or especially to…

IN THIS ISSUE

Mr. PAYFREEZE

It’s mid-November and the buzz is Good’n’Evil’s boys will soon make a new CBA offer that includes a prohibitive luxury tax. Back at the NHL’s Hall of Justice, Mr. Payfreeze is quoted on the league’s CBA website saying luxury tax systems don’t work and the NHL isn’t interested in one. That Payfreeze is everywhere! As the NHL’s top legal eagle, politics alone dictate his place in the pecking order, but the likeable, straight-shooting Payfreeze is also a master at the P.R. game. That’s why Bett-Man can stay in the background during the lockout and let his second-in-command stretch his armor and butt heads with the enemy. The strategy has worked well. The NHL has hung its fiscal hat on the Levitt report, which claims the league lost $273 million in…

IN THIS ISSUE

Brown feeling like a king in Manchester

Though he made the team out of training camp as an 18-year-old, Los Angeles Kings rookie right winger Dustin Brown had a frustrating 2003-04. First there was the issue of sporadic ice time. Then there was a nagging ankle injury, which caused him to miss nearly half the season. And when he did return from the disabled list, Brown found himself a press box regular for nine straight games. So it’s no wonder Brown is enjoying life with Manchester of the American League where he’s regaining the touch that prompted the Kings to make him the 13th overall pick in 2003. “It was great in L.A. last year,” said the Monarchs’ right winger. “Off the ice, it was a great experience to be with guys like Luc (Robitaille) and (Ian) Laperriere and all…

IN THIS ISSUE

Fighting Sioux at. 500 despite pop-gun attack

It was no secret North Dakota would have to take a different approach to offense in 2004. When Hobey Baker Award finalists Zach Parise and Brandon Bochensld signed NHL contracts as underclassmen - the two accounted for 50 goals last season - it meant the Fighting Sioux would need more diversity. “Offense is more of a team effort this year,” sophomore winger Chris Porter told the Grand Forks Herald. “We can’t rely on one or two guys to get it done.” But knowing what must be done and doing it are two different things. The defending regular season champions were. 500 overall (5-5-2) in large part because of their lack of offensive punch. The leading scorer is senior center-right winger Colby Genoway (12 points). The Fighting Sioux were averaging 2.25 goals per game…