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March 5, 1999

March 5, 1999

The Hockey News has been providing the most comprehensive coverage of the world of hockey since 1947. In each issue, you'll find news, features and opinions about the NHL and leagues across North America and the world.

DEPARTMENTS

Wisconsin just can’t beat marvelous Madison boys WCHA

It has become an all too familiar scene. When freshman Jeff Sanger helped Colorado College to a 3-0 victory over Wisconsin Feb. 13, he became the fourth goalie from Madison since 1992 to come back to their hometown and beat the Badgers. Sanger joined J.P. McKersie (Boston University in 1992), Dieter Kochan (Northern Michigan in 1997) and Forrest Karr (Notre Dame in 1998) as native sons who have experienced memorable homecomings. The Badgers recruited Sanger last year, but suggested he spend another season with Sioux City in the United States League. Not agreeing with that advice, Sanger signed on at Colorado College and emerged as the No. 1 goaltender. His numbers after beating the Badgers for his second collegiate shutout: 15-9-1, 2.65 goals-against average,. 900 save percentage. Wisconsin coach Jeff Sauer said he was…

SPECIAL REPORT: FIGHTING WORDS

The NHL Scrapbook

As long as there has been National Hockey League, there has been fighting. A headline in the Jan. 29, 1918 Toronto Star read: “Two Players Under Arrest On A Charge of Fighting, Fighting Players Remanded For Sentencing.’ The story chronicled a skirmish between ’Bad’ Joe Hall of the Montreal Canadiens and Alf Skinner of the Toronto Arenas which actually featured more stick-swinging than punching. In any event, Toronto’s fines charged the two players with disorderly conduct. The worst fighting apparently took place in the paddy wagon on the way to the police station, where four constables and a police sergeant wen required to separate the combatants The next morning, Hall and Skinner stood side by side in court, pleaded guilty to the charges, received suspended sentences and emerged from the courthouse arm-in-arm. It’s an apt…

SPECIAL REPORT: FIGHTING WORDS

Game suffered from ’Philly Flu’

The Broad Street Bullies had three future Hall of Famers in Bobby Clarke, Bill Barber and Bernie Parent. Under coach Fred Shero, they were as determined and well-drilled as any champion in NHL history. But one of their drills-pneumatic punches to the head-undoubtedly helped the Philadelphia Flyers break the armhold (and arms) of the old six-team guard on the way to Stanley Cups in 1974 and 1975. The Boston Bruins were perceived to be big and bad in winning titles in 1970 and 1972, but the Flyers, in their first winning season (1972-73) broke the Vancouver Canucks’ three-year old NHL penalty record by a whopping, whomping, 379 minutes. Thanks to Parent, who had perhaps the two best consecutive seasons of any goalie to that point, the cutting edge (literally sometimes) penalty-killing of Clarke;…

FEATURES

Jagr’s Hart attack

Mario Lemieux has always been a straight shooter. So even if he’s a little biased on the subject of former team-mate Jaromir Jagr, he raised some eyebrows with his recent statement that Jagr is “by far the best player in the world.” Folks in Philadelphia and Buffalo would no doubt want to challenge Lemieux on that one. But as Pittsburgh Penguins’ GM Craig Patrick said, “It’d be hard to argue with it right now.” Nobody-not even relatives of Dominik Hasek, John LeClair or Eric Lindros-could argue that Jagr has been the league’s top player since the all-star break. A prodigious scoring binge (29 points in 12 games) catapulted him to a safe lead in the NHL scoring race and perhaps to the favorite’s role in the battle for the Hart Trophy. I’ve never…