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October 29, 1993

October 29, 1993

The Hockey News has been providing the most comprehensive coverage of the world of hockey since 1947. In each issue, you'll find news, features and opinions about the NHL and leagues across North America and the world.

IN THIS ISSUE

COACHING TIP OF THE WEEK

Rick Comley has a few questions for all youth hockey coaches, parents and players who use the term “puckhog” to describe a youngster who doesn’t pass the puck. “Has anybody ever found out why he doesn’t pass the puck?” Comley asks. “Is he a bad person? Doesn’t he like the players he is teamed with or does he simply not see anybody else on the ice?” Comley, the coach of the Western Collegiate Hockey Association’s Northern Michigan Wildcats, says the answer lies with the skill he labels “visual awareness”, described as the ability of a player to know what’s going on around him at all times-to see what’s going on around him, whether the puck is on his stick or not. Comley, who is beginning his 21st season of National Collegiate Athletic Association…

IN THIS ISSUE

Fighting alive and well in the NHL

If you can figure the NHL’s position on fighting, you’re a better person than I am because I haven’t a clue. A year ago I thought fighting was gone because the NHL said so. The Fifth Avenue grey suits were so upset about fisticuffs they even forced Sega, which had included fighting in its 1992 hockey video game, to drop slugging from its latest model. The way they panicked at the mere mention of fighting, you’d think Mr. Clean would become the next NHL superhero. Not to worry. It is 1993-94 and I am happy to report fighting is as much a part of hockey as it ever was and the rosters speak volumes. Each NHL club carries at least one enforcer and some at least two or three. Even the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim,…

IN THIS ISSUE

AMERICAN LEAGUE

IN THIS ISSUE

Teen sensation

The experts agree Hartford Whaler Chris Pronger has the potential to be a dominant defenseman. Some think he already is one. One thing is indisputable. Pronger is earning a legion of supporters in his first tour of the NHL. The 6-foot-6, 200-pound defenseman is playing about 25 minutes a game and in all situations. During a recent 3-2 win over the Buffalo Sabres, with his team shorthanded, Whaler’s coach Paul Holmgren used Pronger and partner Brad McCrimmon during most of the game’s final minute. “We made a financial commitment to sign him,” Holmgren said of Pronger and his four-year, $7 million contract,”and he’s going to play.” There have been rough patches. Pronger’s errant pass, then blown assignment, led to a Gilbert Dionne winner in Pronger’s NHL debut, a 43 loss to the Montreal Canadiens. Pronger was…