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October 22, 1993

October 22, 1993

The Hockey News has been providing the most comprehensive coverage of the world of hockey since 1947. In each issue, you'll find news, features and opinions about the NHL and leagues across North America and the world.

IN THIS ISSUE

Crisp revises system

It took three straight losses and 18 cups of coffee, but Tampa Bay Lightning coach Terry Crisp has finally concocted a remedy to cure his ailing team. This is no miracle cure, though. Rather, it is an old-fashioned antidote. The same one, in fact, that Crisp used a year ago to pull his team out of the doldrums. “Last year we had a system where we rewarded effort,” Crisp said. “It was a simple system. If you worked hard and gave an honest effort, you played. If you didn’t, you didn’t play. “We wandered away from that system in the first few games. But I’ve let our guys know we’re going back to it. I don’t care who you are or what your name or reputation is. If you give us the effort…

IN THIS ISSUE

Riendeau, Burr furious with Bowman’s system

It didn’t take Detroit Red Wings’ coach Scotty Bowman long to muck things up in the dressing room. Just one game into the season, veterans Shawn Burr and Vincent Riendeau were banging on general manager Bryan Murray’s door, demanding to be traded if they don’t fit into the team’s plans. Saying he would do “everything to help my team win-except sit and watch,” veteran forward Shawn Burr asked to be moved. Burr was scratched from the lineup in the team’s 7-2 win over the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim Oct. 8. Riendeau was right behind Burr. He was relegated to the backup role behind Peter Ing after starter Tim Cheveldae sustained a right knee injury in the Wings’ season opening 6-4 loss to the Dallas Stars Oct. 5. Riendeau wasn’t talking publicly about his desire to…

IN THIS ISSUE

Of young and big bucks

The Hartford Whalers claimed they selected the true No. 1 prospect in the 1993 NHL entry draft. And they paid defenseman Chris Pronger accordingly. Pronger signed a four-year, $7-million contract three hours after the Oct. 5 12:05 a.m., deadline for players to sign and be able to play in the NHL this season. The league ruled Pronger, the No. 2 overall choice in June, is eligible because it was informed of an agreement in principal before midnight. Six 1993 first-rounders signed with their teams and are playing this season. (See accompanying chan for 1993-94 compensation.) A seventh, defenseman Brendan Witt, could not reach agreement with the Washington Capitals. One second-rounder, defenseman Vlastimil Kroupa of the San Jose Sharks, also signed. Swedish center Peter Forsberg signed a four-year, $7-million package with the Quebec Nordiques on the…

IN THIS ISSUE

Parkhurst, Upper Deck team up for new set

It is a marriage of convenience that will undoubtedly produce a spectacular offspring. Upper Deck and Parkhurst announced Sept. 20 that the companies will join forces to produce super-premium cards under the name Parkhurst by The Upper Deck Company. The contract is for five years and the first Parkhurst cards will be available in mid-December, with a second series due out in the spring. Upper Deck will actually produce and distribute the cards using the Parkhurst name. Parkhurst, which manufactured hockey cards from 1951-52 to 1963-64 (with the exception of 1956-57), produced a set of cards last season under Pro Set’s hockey license. Since Pro Set failed to have its license renewed by the NHL Players’ Association this season, Parkhurst was left looking for an NHL licensee to produce its cards. The final decision…