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October 2, 1992

October 2, 1992

The Hockey News has been providing the most comprehensive coverage of the world of hockey since 1947. In each issue, you'll find news, features and opinions about the NHL and leagues across North America and the world.

IN THIS ISSUE

No need to rush Herter

Among past sins, the Vancouver Canucks stand accused of rushing first-round draft picks into their lineup to appease their long-suffering fans. Their motto seemed to be: “We may be lousy now but look at our future.” The future, in most cases, ended up on the trading block as the likes of Rick Vaive and Cam Neely became 50-goal scorers elsewhere. But those days are over for the Canucks. Their breakthrough 96-point season a year ago softened the market for instant saviors. Players like defenseman Jason Herter, the Canucks’ first pick in 1989, are allowed to ripen on the vine. Herter, chosen eighth overall, stayed at the University of North Dakota for another two seasons before turning pro last fall. His progress was slowed by chronic groin problems relating to his hip structure. When he didn’t…

IN THIS ISSUE

Pietrangelo stays…at least for time being

The Hartford Whalers won their arbitration dispute with the Pittsburgh Penguins over goalie Frank Pietrangelo. But that victory means one of three Whaler goalies will likely lose his job. The teams couldn’t agree on compensation for Pietrangelo, who was acquired from Pittsburgh March 10 for future considerations. The Penguins wanted Pietrangelo back. If they couldn’t get Pietrangelo, they wanted goalie Kay Whitmore and a 1993 third-round pick instead. But arbitrator K. Allan Hinnegan chose the Whalers’ proposal Sept. 14, awarding a third-and seventh-round pick in 1994. “Anytime you go into a dispute-resolution situation or court case, there’s an element of risk and uncertainty,” Whalers’ general manager Brian Burke said. “I wasn’t sure it was going to come down that way. I’m glad it did.” So was Pietrangelo, who had spent six years buried in…

IN THIS ISSUE

Leeman must come out screamin’ this season

Dave King’s one-and-only glimpse of Gary Leeman, up close and personal, came back in 1983. That was at the World Junior Championships in Leningrad where a Canadian team including Leeman and Mario Lemieux won a bronze medal. “My recollection of Gary as a player playing for me was very positive,” said King, the Calgary Flames’ first-year head coach. In trying to turn around the Flames after a mediocre 1991-92 season, Leeman is one of King’s top projects. A 50-goal scorer two seasons ago, Leeman had only nine last season. Part of Leeman’s problem after arriving in Calgary last season in a 10-player trade with Toronto, was he didn’t play with a playmaking center. King started him off in training camp with 18-year-old Cory Stillman, the Flames’ first draft choice and the only real…

IN THIS ISSUE

Rheaume will milk act for all it’s worth

Welcome to president-elect Gil Stein’s brave new NHL world. Enter The Steinmeister’s realm and you instantly are assailed with more questions than Eric Lindros has bank accounts. Which means it’s time for The Answer Man. Q: How will referees enforce the league’s new rule on instigation of fights? A: Director of officiating Bryan Lewis is scouring the Australian Outback for a lost tribe of aborigines with eyes at the sides, on top and in back of their heads who will detect all infractions. Q: How can one referee possibly see everything? A: Under the two-eyed, one ref system, officials will nail true instigators 14 per cent of the time, in 50 per cent of the games. That’s under. optimum conditions. Q: If Manon Rheaume is good enough to work out with the Tampa Bay Lightning,…