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March 13, 1992

March 13, 1992

The Hockey News has been providing the most comprehensive coverage of the world of hockey since 1947. In each issue, you'll find news, features and opinions about the NHL and leagues across North America and the world.

IN THIS ISSUE

Olympic hero LeBlanc hailed as a miracle for Ice

Ray LeBlanc may have a second chance to lead a miracle on ice. Well, for Ice at least. Any hope the Indianapolis Ice have to salvage an International League playoff spot will rest on the shoulders of LeBlanc, who surprised many by his outstanding play with the U.S. team at the Winter Olympics. LeBlanc, who played seven games with the Ice before joining the Olympic team, returned to Indianapolis Feb. 25. “Time is running out for us, and the sooner we get Ray the better,” said Indianapolis coach John Marks, who won his 200th career game Feb. 22 in Peoria-a 3-I win. “This has been the worst record of my career. And goaltending, quite honestly, has been our biggest problem. “When we had Dominik Hasek, his body was in Indianapolis but his head…

IN THIS ISSUE

Injuries deflate defense

The San Jose Sharks have one of the weakest defense corps in the NHL and things got a whole lot worse in early March. Injuries to Doug Wilson, Neil Wilkinson and Ken Hammond reduced the Sharks’ defense to a collection of youngsters. Only one player-veteran Bob McGill-is older than 24. Just two players had played more than 20 NHL games before the season began. “We’re in a situation where these guys can’t lay back and hide and wait for somebody else to do the job,” said Sharks’ coach George Kingston. “Sometimes adversity challenges you and forces you to become better in a hurry.” Wilkinson has been out of the lineup since Feb. 5 with a strained back muscle. Hammond broke a knuckle on his right hand during a fight with Vancouver’s Geoff Courtnall…

IN THIS ISSUE

Refs owe it to fans to meet the press

The good news is that officiating is no worse now than half a century ago. The bad news is that it never gets better; which means it’s still pretty much at the same pre-historic level. “As far as I can tell it hasn’t changed in 20 years,” says Winnipeg Jets’ assistant coach Terry Simpson. “Officiating is just like the weather; some days are good and some are bad. Nothing can be done about it.” David Poile doesn’t buy into that theory. “I don’t want to agree with what Simpson says because we’re always working to make things better,” the Washington Capitals’ general manager says, “and we’ve worked on the officiating.” Tell that to Norman Green whose Minnesota North Stars conceivably could lose hundreds of thousands of dollars-not to mention a playoff berth-partly because of…

IN THIS ISSUE

PLAYER OF THE WEEK

With a name like Nystrom, you know he must be good. And make no mistake. Lee Nystrom, 11, is a good young defenseman in the Snow Lake (Man.) Minor Hockey Association. Nystrom-who isn’t related to former Islander great Bob Nystrom-is a rushing defenceman in the Paul Coffey mold. He set a league record with 20 goals and 58 points in 17 tournament games last year. He led his Atom Spartans to the silver medal in the provincial playoffs last year with six goals and 16 points in six games. At 4-foot-11 and 93 pounds, Nystrom isn’t afraid to throw his weight around. And he has added the captain’s “C” to his responsibilities this year. Nystrom is a big fan of the St. Louis Blues. His favorite players are Eric Lindros and Brett Hull. You or…