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February 5, 1988

February 5, 1988

The Hockey News has been providing the most comprehensive coverage of the world of hockey since 1947. In each issue, you'll find news, features and opinions about the NHL and leagues across North America and the world.

IN THIS ISSUE

Whalers Deal ‘Roadrunner’ For ‘Old Reliable’

HARTFORD—Beep, beep. See ya later. Paul Lawless is a roadrunner in search of a fast track. He didn’t find it in Hartford. Maybe he will in Philadelphia. For the second time in three weeks, the Whalers unloaded a former No. 1 draft pick, sending the flash and dash of Lawless to the Flyers for the checking reliability of Lindsay Carson. Both are left wingers. Lawless, 23, appeared on the verge of stardom last year with 22 goals and 54 points in 60 games. With six goals in seven pre-season games, hopes were skyrocketing in Hartford that this would be Lawless’ big season. But since scoring goals in games at Edmonton, Vancouver and Calgary the week before Christmas, he had only one assist. His playing time was steadily reduced until he had become a regular…

IN THIS ISSUE

Robitaille Shoots For The Stars And Scores

LOS ANGELES—Luc Robitaille is proof positive that ninth-round draft picks can find success in the National Hockey League—and recognition in the league’s most remote outpost. “I guess they can’t say nobody knows there’s a team out here anymore.” Robitaille said after he became the first Los Angeles King in seven seasons to capture a starting berth in an NHL AII-StarGame. ‘‘I’m kind of surprised. When I saw my name was on the ballot, I didn’t think anybody would vote for me except my mom and my dad.” Momma and Poppa Robitaille must have been awfully busy punching out those computerized cards because Luc received 242,495 votes in fan balloting for the Feb. 9 game in St. Louis. He outpolled Edmonton’s Glenn Anderson. who finished second among Campbell Conference left wingers, by more…

IN THIS ISSUE

PLAYER OF WEEK JOFA TITAN

Mark Williams is a nine-year-old who says he “lives for hockey.” A right winger on the Essex (Vt.) mite A team, Mark has been on a tear lately. During one January weekend, he scored four goals and eight assists in two games. Mark’s coaches on the mite team are Bob Moreau, Dave Williams and Kevin Murdough. Mark has been playing hockey since age 6, when he started in the Essex program. In the offseason, he plays baseball and soccer. He attends fourth-grade classes at Founders Memorial School in Essex. Mark, who checks in at 4-foot-2 and 50 pounds, admires another little player. His favorite NHL star is Mats Naslund, the Montreal Canadiens’ Swedish-born 5-foot-7, 160-pound left winger. You or someone you know can be part of the TITAN-JOFA Minor Hockey Showcase. Just send a photograph,…

IN THIS ISSUE

What Did They Expect—Moscow Or Manhattan?

ERIC DUHATSCHEK’S Jan. 8 column paints a gloomy picture of Moscow but an even worse one of NHL players. Are NHLers so delicate, so sensitive, so pampered that a couple of weeks in an alien environment would traumatize them? It would seem so, if Duhatschek is correct. No USA Today? Horrors! Steaks imperfectly cooked? Gasp! Street signs in a foreign language? Outrageous! No wonder NHL players are falling over themselves not to go there. I mean, Russkie television doesn’t even have The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson! Seriously, Moscow may not be Montreal or Minneapolis, the food could be better and there are drawbacks to living there. But it does have some wonderful theatres, buildings, parks, cir-cuses, even junk shops—if you take the trouble to look for them. I desperately want to believe that…