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October 17, 1986

October 17, 1986

The Hockey News has been providing the most comprehensive coverage of the world of hockey since 1947. In each issue, you'll find news, features and opinions about the NHL and leagues across North America and the world.

IN THIS ISSUE

Jarvenpaa Turns On The Jets For Winnipeg

WINNIPEG—Hannu Jarvenpaa has never rushed into anything…except, perhaps, a goalmouth where a rebound is sitting. He started playing hockey when he was 13 years old. Drafted at 19, he didn’t turn pro until the age of 23 when Winnipeg Jets signed him. As recently as this summer, he was pecking away at school in the city of Oulu, Fin., 400 miles north of Helsinki. “I never worked because, when you do, you are taxed so heavily it is better to stay in school.” said Jarvenpaa. The number he wears suggests that this, indeed, is someone who dares to be different. ‘I’ve always worn No. 13,” he said. “It’s my lucky number.” A world-class athlete, not unlike his center. Thomas Steen, the robust Jarvenpaa has excited the Jets with his bursts of speed, his heavy hits and…

IN THIS ISSUE

McSorley Tale Reflects Hockey’s Darkest Side

I was shocked after reading Steve Dryden’s Sept. 26 article (Stops-’N’Starts) on Rogie Vachon’s decision to sign Chris McSorley. Can Vachon be so naive to believe a player with a propensity toward fighting (not to speak of the corresponding lack of talent) will be the impetus needed to turn his club around? Vachon’s shortsightedness will not only hurt the Kings in the long run but will also serve to further tarnish hockey’s much-maligned image in the minds of the marginally-educated hockey fan. Vachon’s outdated thinking is a throwback to the dark years in the 1HL when Ted Garvin’s “Murder Incorporated” teams stormed the league. In closing, I am left confused as to where THN stands on the continuing debate over fighting in hockey. After excellent articles this past summer on three-time Lady Byng…

IN THIS ISSUE

Mixed Bag Of Rookies In Calder Trophy Race

In February of last season, as the Calgary Flames started to recover from a monstrous 11-game losing streak, they made a minor roster change that had major repercussions. The Flames replaced one rookie goaltender, Marc D’Amour, with another, Mike Vernon. Calgary had no choice. Not only did D’Amour have a health problem (acute dehydration) and an injury problem (a groin pull) but Vernon had recovered nicely from a slow start and was playing well in the minor leagues. As it happened, Vernon received one opportunity and then another and, then, when he didn’t lose a start from Feb. 24th until the end of the season, he effectively supplanted Reggie Lemelin as the team’s starting goalie. Then came the playoffs. The Flames established a league record by playing 22 playoff games in seven weeks.…

IN THIS ISSUE

McCrimmon Contract Talks At An Impasse

PHILADELPHIA—The soft-toss contract negotiations between the Philadelphia Flyers and Brad McCrimmon have turned into hardball. Who threw the first high, hard one? Officially McCrimmon, by refusing to play in the team’s sixth exhibition game. General manager Bobby Clarke responded by suspending the defenseman. McCrimmon is bound to the Flyers for the 1986-87 season by the option year of his contract. Clarke’s point, that “Brad should fulfill it” is on the surface, both legally and ethically correct. Nonetheless, there is a good question to be asked about how fair that option year is in McCrimmon’s case. And another as to why the Flyers, who were told the week before by McCrimmon that he didn’t want to risk injury in exhibition games until he received a new contract, chose to take the 27-year-old defenseman to…