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November 29, 1985

November 29, 1985

The Hockey News has been providing the most comprehensive coverage of the world of hockey since 1947. In each issue, you'll find news, features and opinions about the NHL and leagues across North America and the world.

IN THIS ISSUE

ASK THE REFEREE

Q: How many games in a row can a team play? For example, if the Bruins played on Friday and Saturday, could they play on Sunday? Bill LanerganSouth Weymouth, MA. A: No, they couldn’t. There is a league rule that a team cannot be scheduled three nights in a row. During the exhibition season the teams often play three nights in a row but will use a varied lineup because the players have the right to opt out of playing those three nights in a row. Many still play, though, to help with their conditioning for the regular season. Q: I attended a game between Binghamton and Hershey of the American League. At 1:52 of the second period, a Hershey player received a four-minute penalty for roughing and a Binghamton player received a…

IN THIS ISSUE

Hardy, Kings At Loggerheads Over Contract

LOS ANGELES—Mark Hardy says he is prepared to go elsewhere, even as far away as Europe, unless contract differences with the Los Angeles Kings can be resolved. The 26-year-old defenseman is in the option year of the contract he signed before last season and negotiations with general manager Rogie Vachon have ^one nowhere. “Quite frankly, I’ve become disenchanted with the whole thing,” said Ron Salcer, Hardy’s agent. These have been difficult times for Hardy. Aside from the contract squabble, he’s still recovering from surgery to repair a tendon in his left wrist and has yet to play a regular-season game. “I was really ready to have a big year, too,” Hardy said. “I wanted to go out and try and dominate every game if I could, And I think I’m a leader on this…

IN THIS ISSUE

Flyers Say Final Farewell To Fallen Friend

PHILADELPHIA—A mist drifted down from a mottled pewter sky, and a church bell tolled as the Philadelphia Flyers and friends gathered within Old Swedes Church to bid a private farewell to Pelle Lindbergh. When the bell stopped ringing, footsteps could be heard on the cobblestone walk outside the church, as Lindbergh’s mother, father and fiancee, Kerstin Pietzsch, solemnly walked toward the entrance. From the door of a white Lincoln limousine, they walked past a small, simple graveyard and into the church. Inside were Lindbergh’s teammates, other members of the Flyers’organization, representatives from the Philadelphia Phillies, Eagles and Sixers, and a few members of other National Hockey League organizations. They had all come to pay a private tribute to a fallen team. mate, and friend. On the following night, before a game with the…

IN THIS ISSUE

Hamilton City-In-Waiting For National League Team

LIKE A BRIDE with a full dowry, the city of Hamilton sits at the end of Lake Ontario, waiting hopefully for someone from the National Hockey League to come along and lead her to the altar. Hamilton has been waiting for an NHL team for some time, but now, with the 17,500-seat Copps Coliseum sitting in splendor in the heart of the downtown area, the city is more than willing, it’s eager. The Copps Coliseum was shown to journalists on Nov. 7 and it is, as promised, an NHL facility. It has plenty of seating, respectable sight-lines, state-of-the-art refrigerating equipment and, of course, the mandatory undersized press box. Just an hour down the Queen Elizabeth Way from Toronto, the Copps Coliseum would provide the home for a natural NHL rivalry. In fact, Hamiltonians…