Search for your favorite player or team

© The Hockey News. All rights reserved. Any and all material on this website cannot be used, reproduced, or distributed without prior written permission from Roustan Media Ltd. For more information, please see our Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.


October 5, 1984

October 5, 1984

The Hockey News has been providing the most comprehensive coverage of the world of hockey since 1947. In each issue, you'll find news, features and opinions about the NHL and leagues across North America and the world.

IN THIS ISSUE

Swedes Earn Respect With Strong Showing

Before the Canada Cup tournament opened, the event’s organizer Alan Eagleson said that the biggest shot in the gate the six-nation competition could receive was a strong entry from Sweden. Eagle’s view was that if Tre Kronor, the Swedish national team, could be competitive the way it was in the 1976 Canada Cup and not the pushovers of ’81, then the event would be a five-team race. As things turned out, the Swedes’ excellent showing and advance to the final, especially when the expected strong showing from Czechoslovakia dissolved in winless mediocrity, injected a sizeable amount of interest into the event. That performance also was a major boost for Swedish hockey. It also was a socko debut as national team coach Lief Boork, who molded a combination of National Hockey League players, the…

IN THIS ISSUE

The Hawks Will Be Put To The Test Early

CHICAGO—Two years ago, when Orval Tessier was the Black Hawks’ rookie coach, he led them to a 104-point season and was the National Hockey League Coach of the Year. Banners in Chicago Stadium went so far as to make him a write-in candidate for mayor. In 10 years no other coach had gotten so much out of Chicago’s boys of winter. Not Billy Reay. Not Bill White. Not Bob Pulford. Not Eddie Johnston. Not Keith Magnuson. But last year Tessier’s team had almost as many injuries as Chicago has potholes. The Hawks nosedived to 68 points, their sorriest season since 197677 when White took over a bad team from Reay at Christmas and helplessly watched it get progressively worse. Corresponding with the Hawks’ fall from grace, Tessier’s relationship with some of the players…

IN THIS ISSUE

Competition Will Be Keen With Canadiens

MONTREAL—Steve Penney has no worries. He will be the No. I goaltender for the Montreal Canadiens when they begin their 1984-85 National Hockey League season Oct. 11 in Buffalo. But there is a battle for the No. 2 goaltending job as well as some interesting competition at other positions as coach Jacques Lemaire and the team management watches closely. “It is going to be a tough decision for the coach to decide the goaltenders,” admitted Penney, one of the Canadiens’ playott heroes last spring. “I played with Paul Pageau in Shawinigan. He played with the Olympic team and he is a good goaltender. He didn’t have the chance to prove what he could do with the Los Angeles Kings.” “I played with (Mark) Holden and (Greg) Moffett in Halifax. They are both good…

IN THIS ISSUE

Rangers Want To Keep Up The Momentum

NEW YORK—It’s begun already. On the day the Ranger veterans were scheduled to report to training camp, the New York Post ran a headline that reflects the theme of the coming season: RANGER CAMP THINKS CUP The Rangers have done that every year since 1940, which—as nobody here needs to be reminded—was the last time they won the Stanley Cup. But there have been few years when the team could actually verify that quest with a true symbol. This year they can. The fifth and final game of last spring’s opening-round playoff loss to the Islanders proves that the Rangers are contenders. “The players got a lot of momentum from the Islander series, they’re still talking about it,” said assistant coach Carol Vadnais. “They know from that series that they can go…