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January 21, 1983

January 21, 1983

The Hockey News has been providing the most comprehensive coverage of the world of hockey since 1947. In each issue, you'll find news, features and opinions about the NHL and leagues across North America and the world.

IN THIS ISSUE

Take It Easy

The International Hockey Weekly Founded in 1947 Published by W.C.C. Publishing Ltd. 214 King St. West, Suite 314, Toronto, Ont. M5H 1K4 BEFORE THE Soviet Union all-star team departed for the home-land-laden with the spoils of a Montreal shopping blitz for goods that we assume are unavailable in Moscow’s famous GUM department store-someone should have stepped forward and presented coach Viktor Tikhonov and his players with the Nobel Peace Prize. Let’s be honest, they deserve it. After all, who else could get Harold Ballard and Ed Snider espousing the same philosophy. Snider, of course, owns the Philadelphia Flyers. Ballard, as you know, owns the Toronto Maple Leafs. And to put it mildly, they loathe each other. Yet there was Ed Snider, his Flyers just having absorbed a 5-1 pasting by the Soviets at the Spectrum…

IN THIS ISSUE

Wings Give Murdoch His Walking Papers

GLENS FALLS—The message from Detroit came through loud and clear: “We’re paying attention.” Mark Lofthouse heard it and packed his bags. Don Murdoch heard it and packed his, too. Larry Lozinski heard it and kept stopping pucks. He probably feels comfortable enough now to unpack his bags and stay for a while. In a 48-hour span midway through the first week of 1983, change, the word that had been overused in the first three years of the Adirondack Red Wings’ existence, came back into play. First, Mark Lofthouse, the hottest player in the American Hockey League, was summoned to Detroit at a time when he was wondering whether anyone was noticing impressive scoring statistics. Veteran Tom Rowe was sent down from the parent club. The next day, Lozinski, with the aid of a tight…

IN THIS ISSUE

HOCKEY VIEW POINT

A Few Days With Vlad THE CHEERING started in the Montreal Forum on New Year’s Eve when Vladislav Tretiak was introduced in the starting lineup of the Soviet Union all-stars—in reality, the USSR national team—before the game with the Montreal Canadiens. For approximately one minute, the yells and applause cascaded down while the brilliant goalie stood at the blueline, his cheeks slightly rosier than usual. After Tretiak had blanked the Candaiens, 5-0, and was chosen the Soviets’ player of the game, the reaction was even stronger. The Forum fans gave him a standing ovation and forced him to skate out of the player line for two bows, a tribute to a superb athlete and one of the most interesting hockey players the game has had in the past decade. Later, Tretiak, USSR coach Victor…

IN THIS ISSUE

HOCKEY SCHOOLS… In The Western United States