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October 20, 1978

October 20, 1978

The Hockey News has been providing the most comprehensive coverage of the world of hockey since 1947. In each issue, you'll find news, features and opinions about the NHL and leagues across North America and the world.

IN THIS ISSUE

Oil Kings Challenging To Tennant; Portland Goaler Hunter Aims High

LOUISVILLE HOCKEY STICKS Made in Canada by HILLERICH & BRADSBY. LTD Arnold Street. Wallaceburg. Ontario Sold in U.S. and Canada LOUISVILLE HOCKEY STICKS Made in Canada by HILLERICH & BRADSBY. LTD Arnold Street. Wallaceburg. Ontario Sold in U.S. and Canada EDMONTON— Wayne Tennant had a far-ranging reputation as a hockey coach capable of working wonders with young players. But while he didn’t want to go too far for a hockey job, be bided his time until a hockey team came to him. And when that happened—Flin Flon Bombers defunct franchise was sold to an Edmonton group—Tennant was one of the first people hired. As coach, naturally. Tennant, 40, has been active in the Edmonton minor hockey ranks, but he says he had “almost given up on the idea of coaching major junior hockey…I passed up a couple of opportunities in the last couple of years…

IN THIS ISSUE

Added Versatility Flames’ Objective In Moving Clement

ATLANTA— In the early going of the 1977-78 season, veteran Bill Clement and his linemates John Gould and rookie Harold Phillipoff carried the Atlanta Flames over some rough spots. With the rest of the team in a scoring slump, the trio kept the Flames around the .500 mark until they got their act together and finished with their best season overall, 34-27-19. In between centering the team’s most productive line, Clement was also called on to kill penalties, most of the time with Gould, and he did it with the best in the league. The 28-year-old ended the season with 20 goals and 30 assists, but his value was much greater than his statistics. Phillipoff, who enjoyed a fine rookie season, credited Clement with much of his success and veteran Gould also heaped praises…

IN THIS ISSUE

Rookie Crop Might Be Hawks’ Best Of Decade

CHICAGO— Kids, They say the darndest things, do the darndest things, make you think the darndest things. They make you think that people like Murray Bannerman, Tim Higgins, Doug Lecuyer, Rick Paterson, Brian Young, Mark Murphy and Reg Kerr could, someday soon, make the Black Hawks a contender rather than a pretender. It happened once before, in 1969-70, so it would have to be a case of lightning striking twice. In that winter, the Black Hawks were coming off a last-place finish the season before. Into camp came five young men named Tony Esposito, Keith Magnuson, Cliff Korroll, Gerry Pinder and Paul Shmyr. They fit like a glove with an already not-bad team featuring Bobby Hull and Stan Mikita and helped the Hawks stage the most remarkable comeback in National Hockey League history—from last to…

IN THIS ISSUE

Canadiens Trade Wilson To Kings, Take Chance With Others In Draft

MONTREAL— The National Hockey League’s waiver draft has been hovering like a dark cloud over many a team’s training camp and pre-season exhibition schedule, but none more so than that of the Montreal Canadiens, the team with the most to lose in terms of player personnel. With each NHL club allowed to protect 18 skaters plus two goaltenders, in addition to two players entering their third year as professionals, the Canadiens found themselves into the last week of training camp with 27 players who were still hoping to be a part of the 1978-79 squad, and a 28th name in Bill Nyrop who had returned to his Edina, Minn., home saying he had retired from hockey. The two goaltenders to be protected were easy enough to figure out; Ken Dryden and Michel (Bunny)…