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January 8, 1971

January 8, 1971

The Hockey News has been providing the most comprehensive coverage of the world of hockey since 1947. In each issue, you'll find news, features and opinions about the NHL and leagues across North America and the world.

IN THIS ISSUE

Spurs’ Stock Goes Up As Team Snaps Slump

DENVER— The financially plagued Denver Spurs offered $300,000 worth of common stock, 60,000 shares at $5 each, for sale to keep the Western Hockey League team alive. The Spurs came to life at the same time, ending a seven game losing streak with a 5-2 victory over the Salt Lake City Golden Eagles and followed the next night with a 3-3 tie with the league leading Portland Buckaroos. Gene Kinasewich, WHL president who said the league endorses the public sale of stock is giving limited financial support but if the present owners decided to back out this season, the league wouldn’t take over the club. The schedule would be adjusted to continue with five teams. Sports Holdings, Inc., present owners, hoped to interest prospective buyers by offering a 25 per cent discount on a…

IN THIS ISSUE

Hockey Ad Lib

A Defensive Defenseman… EXPANSION HAS POPPED KIDS to the top. The last few years, more 20-year-old first-year professionals have been playing in the majors than ever before. Some very well. This year’s bunch is headed by Gil Perreault and Dale Tallon, who were the highly publicized top choices in last summer’s draft of graduating amateurs, but others further down the list are showing enormous promise, too. In the long run, the amateur draft figures to be the surest road to parity for expansion teams striving to catch up to established clubs. The Hulls and Orrs of the future have to come out of this draft and the weaker clubs which finish lowest will have the first shots at them every year… Unless they’re traded away their future draft picks for veterans of…

IN THIS ISSUE

Penguins’ Ownership To Stay In NHL Hands

PITTSBURGH— The National Hockey League now has full control of the Pittsburgh Penguins. The reason for this is that a proposed sale of the Penguins to Metromedia has fallen through. The NHL assumed control of the Penguins Dec. 1 from owner Donald Parsons because of an overdue note of $3.5 million owed the Mellon National Bank. Sale price of the club is reported to be $5.5 million. League president Clarence Campbell said there are a lot of people interested in buying the Penguins, “but there is one formidable obstacle and that is the negotiation of a lease of the arena.” The city owns the Pittsburgh Civic Arena and prospective buyers have been unable to negotiate modifications in the current lease. Campbell also said that while there are plenty of candidates for the franchise “most want to move…

IN THIS ISSUE

WHL Directors Approve Of Calgary’s Return

SEATTLE— Calgary will return to the Western Hockey League next season. said WHL president Eugene Kinasewich. The return depends on suitable dates being arranged in the Calgary arena. “It’s all set as far as we’re concerned,” said Kinasewich. “I’m optimistic the situation as to dates can be worked out.” A travel subsidy to help defray the increased cost to teams, visiting Calgary has been tentatively approved by WHL directors. The subsidy would be paid by the Vancouver Canucks of the National Hockey League. The Vancouver team made a provision for a farm club in the WHL in their settlement over indemnification for loss of the Vancouver territory. Calgary and Edmonton dropped out of the WHL in 1962-62 after 13 years. This season with Vancouver moving into the NHL, was the first time the WHL had operated without…