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August 1, 1968

August 1, 1968

The Hockey News has been providing the most comprehensive coverage of the world of hockey since 1947. In each issue, you'll find news, features and opinions about the NHL and leagues across North America and the world.

IN THIS ISSUE

Clippers Join Forces With NHL Red Wings

BALTIMORE, Md.— The Baltimore Clippers announced the signing of a working agreement for the coming 1968-69 American Hockey League season with the Detroit Red Wings of the National League. Details of the new arrangement between the Clippers and the Red Wings were finalized at the recent hockey draft meeting in Montreal between Terry Reardon, general manager of the Baltimore club and Baz Bastien, assistant general manager of the Red Wings. The new arrangement received the unqualified endorsement of both Sid Abel, general manager of the Red Wings and Robert C. (Jake) Embry, president of the Clippers. In hammering out the new pact, Reardon and highly pleased with the deal. “Detroit will send us from four to six players,” Reardon revealed, “and at least three of these players will be among their best young prospects. The…

IN THIS ISSUE

Crozier Exerts Magic Touch Again As Amerks Escape Draft Unscathed While Grabbing Off Five Players

ROCHESTER, N.Y.— “Them that has, gits” is a common colloguial expression in parts of the United States, and a perfect example of its meaning is Joe Crozier. The amazing general manageneral manager and coach of the Rochester Americans arrived at the annual draft meetings in Montreal full of trepidation about what would happen to his powerful hockey club. After all, the Amerks had just completed another sweep of American Hockey League regular season and playoff laurels. “We’ll lose at least three good hockey players somewhere along the line during the drafts,” Crozier bemoaned. But he must have cast some sort of magic spell over everyone else in attendance, because not only did the Rochester Americans escape unscathed, they actually strengthened themselves at three key positions and Crozier wound up with five more hockey players…

IN THIS ISSUE

Rookie Winner Quick To Shun ‘Bad Man’ Role

BOSTON, MASS.— When an analysis is made of the strong points of the squad that moved the Bruins from sixth to third place in the National Hockey League last season, one of the stresses is at center ice. And one of the major reasons for this transformation was rookie Derek Sanderson. Playing his first professional season Sanderson succeeded Bobby Orr as the NHL’s Rookie of the Year and now everyone connected with Boston hockey is willing to predict that the aggressive 22-year-old also will become one of the game’s brightests stars. Sanderson was hardly an unknown to Bruins’ brass or other hockey experts when he appeared at the London, Ont. training camp a year ago. Playing with the Niagara Falls Flyers in the OHA he led the league in scoring for three straight years. He stood…

IN THIS ISSUE

Bruins’ Chances Loaded With Buts And Ifs

BOSTON, Mass.— If can be the most frustrating word in sports, but in any preseason discussion of the Bruins it is a most necessary preface to the 1968-69 campaign. If Bobby Orr can come back after a second knee operation for a faulty cartilage; if Johnny Bucyk can recover from a back ailment that plagued him particularly during the second half of last season; if Phil Esposito can play back to his personal record of 84 points with 35 goals and 49 assists; if the squad again can produce six additional 20 or better goal scorers, the Bruins can think of no worse that repeating their third place finish of 1967-68. The question of Orr’s physical condition is listed first since it is the most ticklish of the contingencies that face the B’s. Only…