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April 25, 2006

April 25, 2006

The Hockey News has been providing the most comprehensive coverage of the world of hockey since 1947. In each issue, you'll find news, features and opinions about the NHL and leagues across North America and the world.

COVER STORY

NEW SENSATION

A few years ago Daniel Alfredsson boldly announced his Ottawa Senators would win the Stanley Cup. Then, a few days later, he backed off his ambitious statement by saying something to the affect of, “I didn’t say this year.” The Senators, of course, have not won a Stanley Cup; at least not since 1927. The current incarnation of the Ottawa Senators has yet to even make it to the final since joining the league in 1992-93. So, any predictions for us this year, Daniel? “No,” Alfredsson says with a chuckle. You’re out of the prediction-making business? “Not exactly,” he continues. “I think it will be a great playoffs. There will be some upsets, as always, and it’s going to be really fun playing in the playoffs and watching the other games as well.” OK, if you won’t…

COVER STORY

CANADIENS

HOW THEY BEAT YOU Goaltending and quick puck movement. Cristobal Huet starred following the trade of Jose Theodore – and he had to behind this small but fast team. The Habs won seven in a row through late March and early April, thanks in large part to Huet’s heroics. Montreal is also solid on the power play, ranking fifth overall. HOW THEY’RE EXPOSED The Canadiens have an average set of defensemen. They’re not overly big or physical, so they must rely on getting the puck out of their zone. In addition, their 23rd-ranked penalty kill must step it up in the playoffs against the Ottawas, Carolinas and Rangers or face an early exit. QUESTION MARK The Canadiens will go as far as Huet takes them, but he has no NHL playoff experience.…

DEPARTMENTS

Bench bosses prepare for playoffs – or the golf course

THE COACHES As the run for the Stanley Cup nears, we look at the men behind the players. Mike Babcock had a successful debut campaign in Detroit, where the ex-trapper found some loaded guns to play with, while Columbus’s Gerard Gallant and Washington’s Glen Hanlon went for more modest goals by simply building up their teams. Others, such as Toronto’s Pat Quinn and Vancouver’s Marc Crawford, may be looking for work soon.…

DEPARTMENTS

Carle grabs Hobey

It was last call for a terrific college career. Denver junior defenseman Matt Carle edged out Wisconsin junior goalie Brian Elliott and Boston College senior forward Chris Collins to win the 2006 Hobey Baker Memorial Award as the top player in college hockey. Carle signed a contract with the San Jose Sharks after his Pioneers, who won back-to-back NCAA championships in his first two seasons with the team, were eliminated from contention. After posting 11 goals and 53 points in 39 games with Denver, the 6-foot, 182-pound blueliner made a smooth transition to the NHL, netting two goals and four points in eight games with the Sharks.…